General(ly) Gillmore – Lorain the early years- Pt. 3

September 13, 2014 at 4:37 pm 5 comments

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Part One https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/05/general-quincy-a-gillmore-the-dining-room-dilemna/

Part Two https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/08/general-ly-gillmore-lorain-the-early-years/

As I research further and further with old maps etc. I realized just how much the Gillmores owned in this settlement – 1,000 acres was huge . The family cleared land whilst keeping a wary eye out for the Indians and the British. They cut their paths through from their “homesteads, cabins, dwellings” through the forests to trade at a trading post on the other side of the river or to the little community growing up next to the port.
monument-by-river
http://danielebrady.blogspot.com/2012/08/that-lorain-monument-by-river.html

How terribly hard this must have been even on good weather days. I cannot begin to imagine how hard the life was for those that came after the Revolutionary War leaving what amounted to the “civilized society of those times” to eke out a whole new beginning but this family was no stranger to new beginnings. .
According to the “Gillmore Genealogy” written by
Mr. Claude Charles Hamel Amherst Ohio- revised 1954)

The Gillmores (Gilmore) descended from Robert and Mary Ann (Kennedy) Gilmore who came to America August 4th 1718 as part of the Scotch- Irish contingency ( Presbyterians ).

The Scotch-Irish were Presbyterians. They had splintered away from the official English church. In 1688 the ascension of William to the English throne brought relative peace to Ireland. The Scotch-Irish were allowed to practice their religion, but were required to pay the church of England 10% of everything they produced. The land they lived on and worked was only leased to them by the crown – they could be evicted at any time.

https://mikenh.wordpress.com/tag/ulster-scots/

They arrived on the Brigantine ROBERT to the port of Boston- there was an outbreak of smallpox on board and they may have wintered in Boston. http://www.lynx2ulster.com/ScotchIrishPioneers/008.php . They ( the Scotch- Irish) petitioned the New World

Boyd

Source http://www.1718migration.org.uk/siteFiles/resources/pdf/petition.pdf

In the Spring of 1718, a body of Scotch-Irish from Northern Ireland sent a petition, signed by 319 representative men on 26 March 1718(1), to Governor Shute of Massachusetts Bay in the New World requesting land for settlement.

http://wjmontgomeryfamilytree.homestead.com/IrishImmigrationWilliamandMary.html

“We whose names are underwritten, Inhabitants of ye North of Ireland, Doe in our own names, and in the names of many others, our Neighbors, Gentlemen, Ministers, Farmers, and Tradesmen, Commissionate and appoint our trusty and well beloved friend, the Reverend Mr. William Boyd, of Macasky, to His Excellency, the Right Honorable Collonel Samuel Suitte, Governour of New England, and to assure His Excellency of our sincere and hearty Inclination to Transport ourselves to that very excellant and renowned Plantation upon our obtaining from His Excellency suitable incouragement. And further to act and Doe in our Names as his prudence shall direct. Given under our hands this 26th day of March, Anno Dom. 1718.”

sign nutfiled
SOURCE: https://mikenh.wordpress.com/tag/ulster-scots/
Robert arrived in Nutfield ( now Londonderry New Hampshire) – at an early date the eastern half of David Cargill deeded a lot of 70 acres to Robert Gillmore for the site of a fulling mill

Fulling Mill ( cloth)

Fulling Mill ( cloth)

This lot was north of his son’s Williams lot in the same range and near Beaver Pond. His son was one of the original proprietors of Londonderry NH with two shares

Robert had a son William born around 1686 in Ulster Ireland – 1753 Londonderry NH. William in turn had a son

Ruggles Woodbridge

Ruggles Woodbridge


James Gillmore, born in 1728 was the father of Edmund Gillmore Sept 28th 1765 the same Edmund who arrived in 1811/12 in to what is now known as Lorain .
James did serve in the Revolutionary War at the age of 49 he marched with Lieut. Col. Ruggles Woodbridge albeit for 6 days but obviously felt strongly enough to sign up and answer the call:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodbridge’s_Regiment_of_Militia

“They came to America, not as discoverers,
but as the pioneers of their race ; they defended the
frontiers against Indians, and their numbers in the
South so much augmented the forces in the Revolu-
tionary army that they may fairly be said to have
saved Washington from defeat.”

https://archive.org/stream/scotchirish00boltrich/scotchirish00boltrich_djvu.txt

Edmund, reached what is now known as Lorain, claimed his land and built a log cabin- after the home was ready he left his son Aretus, in charge and returned to Massachusetts for the rest of his family returning with them by ox team in June of 1812.

The first election for township officers was held in the home of Justice of the Peace John S Reid on April 17th 1817 Edmund was one of the two judges of the Election. Edmund was also elected one of the two Overseers of the Poor . Also the first school was opened in an unoccupied cabin belonging to Edmund Gillmore – Schools were then maintained by private subscription , as the state had no general education until 1825.

The third school : 4th Street
4th street school

During 1853, a two-story frame building was constructed on Fourth Street. This was the only schoolhouse within the limits of the town until 1870 when a four-room, two-story brick building was completed. The cost of this building, which later became a part of the high school, was fifteen thousand dollars. The building site had been purchased for an additional two thousand dollars.

They lived on this farm for the rest of their lives………………..

TO BE CONTINUED….

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Brit take, Charleston Village, city of lorain, education, history, Lorain's Magical History Tour. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

September 11th- the Memory and the Terror -2014 General(ly) Gillmore- Lorain- Part 4

5 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Renee Dore  |  September 13, 2014 at 6:36 pm

    Loraine-you have really done a lot of research on this family. When you mention original land it is important to mention Veteran’s Park too-who the Gillmores lived across the street from on Washington Ave. The park may have also been Gillmore property at one time. This historic property ( original land of the Western Reserve) is well deserving of a historic sign of some sort-an Ohio Historic Marker would be very appropriate. thanks, Renee

  • 2. Loraine Ritchey  |  September 13, 2014 at 7:08 pm

    Renee I did mention it in part two ( see link ) in this post but there will be more coming on that later

  • 3. Renee Dore  |  September 13, 2014 at 7:41 pm

    Thanks, I’ll have a look.

  • 4. General(ly) Gillmore- Lorain- Part 4 | That Woman's Weblog  |  September 17, 2014 at 1:17 pm

    […] Part Twohttps://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/08/general-ly-gillmore-lorain-the-early-years/ Part Threehttps://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/13/generally-gillmore-lorain-the-early-years-pt-3/ […]

  • […] Part Twohttps://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/08/general-ly-gillmore-lorain-the-early-years/ Part Threehttps://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/13/generally-gillmore-lorain-the-early-years-pt-3/ […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Categories

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 179 other followers

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug   Oct »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930