General(ly) Gillmore – The Civil War- Part 9

October 9, 2014 at 5:12 pm Leave a comment

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Part One https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/05/general-quincy-a-gillmore-the-dining-room-dilemna/
Part Two https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/08/general-ly-gillmore-lorain-the-early-years/
Part Three https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/13/generally-gillmore-lorain-the-early-years-pt-3/
Part Four https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/generally-gillmore-lorain-part-4/
Part Five https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/23/general-ly-gillmore-lorain-civil-war-part-5/
Part Six https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/26/general-lygillmore-recogniton-lorain-pt-6/
Part Sevenhttps://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/09/30/general-ly-gillmore-the-portraits-of-men-part-7/
Part Eighthttps://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2014/10/06/generally-gillmore-the-civil-war-part-8/
Quincy A Gillmore was in the thick of things with the Battle of Fort Pulaski April 10th 1862

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Pulaski
Fort-Pulaski-Under-Fire-April-1862-Leslie-s-Weekly-Mod
Source :Leslie’s Weekly Magazine, “Fort Pulaski Under Fire”, April 1862 – http://www.nps.gov/fopu/parknews
1. Battle of Fort Pulaski April 10–11, 1862 Georgia
Union victory: Union blockade closes Savannah, Georgia. Parrott rifle makes masonry forts obsolete.
2. Second Battle of Fort Wagner
(Battle of Fort Wagner, Morris Island) July 18, 1863 South Carolina
Confederate victory: second of two Union attempts to take Ft. Wagner fails, heroism of the 54th Massachusetts a regiment of African-Americans led (as required by regulation) by white commissioned officers. Gillmore had ordered that his forces be integrated and that African-Americans were not to be assigned menial tasks only, such as KP or latrine duty, but instead they were to carry arms into battle. They and their assault on Ft. Wagner were the subject of the 1989 Civil War movie Glory, which starred Morgan Freeman and Matthew Broderick.
Glory_ver1

Fort Wagner, which protected Morris Island, south of Charleston Harbor. The battle came one week after the First Battle of Fort Wagner.

On July 18, 1863, after the heavy land and sea bombardment subsided, Gillmore sent forward his Federal regiments. The assault was led by the 54th Massachusetts regiment; a Boston regiment filled with free African-Americans, and led by the Harvard educated Col. Robert Gould Shaw. The decision to have the 54th Massachusetts lead this dangerous attack was fraught with all sorts of political and military risk, but in the end it was Shaw’s men that led the attack up the narrow beach.

http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/batterywagner/battery-wagner-history-articles/fortwagnerpohanka.html
gillmore  scan

The moment of trial for the 54th Massachusetts had come about through the appointment of a new Union commander, the then Brig. Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore, who had taken charge of the Department of the South on June 11, 1863, replacing the querulous and unpopular Maj. Gen. David Hunter. Stocky and balding, the 38-year- old Gillmore had stood first in the West Point class of 1849, and had gone on to make a name for himself as a talented and intellectually inclined officer of engineers. His successful siege of Confederate Fort Pulaski early in the war had secured the water approaches to Savannah, Ga., and had won Gillmore wide acclaim. The victory had also fueled his considerable ambition.

http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/batterywagner/battery-wagner-history-articles/fortwagnerpohanka.html

swamp angel
General Gillmore also famous for the “Swamp Angel” and the bombardment of Charleston- the politics of the day come into play:

Why (Gen.) Gillmore erected and used this battery has never been fully explained. In his official report, Gillmore states that the battery was built to drive shipping away from the city’s wharves, and at other times, the whole episode seems to take on the atmosphere of a giant experiment in engineering and artillery firing.

By existing rules of warfare, Charleston was a legitimate target. It was an armed camp. There were fortifications in the city. It was home to a number of munition plants, and its wharves served blockade runners who carried war supplies.

Southern Banner, Jul. 27, 1864 http://athnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/athnewspapers-j2k/view?docId=bookreader/sbn/sbn1864/sbn1864-0117.mets.xml#page/1/mode/1up

Southern Banner newspaper
But the reasons ran even deeper. To Northerners, Charleston was the symbol of rebellion. It was there that South Carolina officials voted for secession and started the inevitable march toward war. The firing on Fort Sumter, which started the conflict, only increased the North’s belief that Charleston was a city of fire-eaters who deserved punishment. For most Northerners, Charleston’s destruction seemed just retribution.

General Gillmore 1863 Charleston Harbor

General Gillmore 1863 Charleston Harbor

The Northern military also wanted redemption. Their impotence during the 1861 Fort Sumter crisis had deeply wounded the pride of many officers. If they could reduce Charleston like the Romans had reduced Carthage, so much the better.

NOTE:There are fascinating accounts as to the thinking of the time and everyday running of the war – the exchanges between the opposing Generals at Charleston Gillmore (Union) and General Beaureguard ( Confederacy) – they not only exchanged gunfire but letters,

General Beaureguard

General Beaureguard


It gives on pause to think this was happening in the midst of carnage . The bombardment of Chalreston caused international furor
http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/m/moawar/text/waro0047.txt

Gillmore was well aware of these attitudes and shared them. He also had a personal motive for firing on the city. His well-laid-out plan had gone awry. He had seen his army shattered on the sands of Morris Island and his own physical condition reduced as the campaign sapped his confidence and energy. Revenge, for the blood of his soldiers, his countrymen, and himself, was also an important factor in his construction and use of the Swamp Angel

http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/batterywagner/battery-wagner-history-articles/the-swamp-angel.html

Back home in Ohio , in what was “Charleston Village/ Black River Fanny Gillmore ( daughter of Alanson Gillmore ) later to marry Captain Thomas Wilford was receiving letters from those who were fighting and her brother Byron Gillmore makes mention of General Gillmore in his letters home fanny gilmore  wilford
https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2008/02/12/capt-wilford-a-hero-of-the-inland-seas/ was receiving letters from those young men locally who were fighting https://thatwoman.wordpress.com/2011/04/13/civil-war-letters-fannie-gilmore-lorain/ and her brother Byron Gillmore makes mention of General Gillmore in his letters home. You can find the PDF file of some of the letters written from the Plain Dealer article of 1961 commemorating the 100th anniversary of the start of the Civil War Civil War Letters to a Young Lady, Fanny McQueen Gillmore, by F

Byron Gillmore Dec 12th 1862 Lexington Kentucky
… The report was that there was 20 thousand rebels up at Big Hill about 50 miles from here…. I hope it is so and they will come and attact for there has got to be some fighting done and we might as well do it now as any other time and then we could see whether General Gillmore would fight or not. It is my opinion that he would fight as long as there was a man left. He is not only brave but he understands his business about as well as the next one

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Entry filed under: Charleston Village, city of lorain, history, Lorain's Magical History Tour, men of substance, war and peace. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

General(ly) Gillmore- The Civil War- Part 8 General (ly) Gillmore- Star Spangled – Part 10

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